News

Which NHLer is mostly like to spend his whole career with one team?

Jason Kay
By:

Brodeur & Lundqvist (Photo by Dave Sandford/NHLI via Getty Images) Author: The Hockey News

News

Which NHLer is mostly like to spend his whole career with one team?

Jason Kay
By:

Martin Brodeur caused a stir when he said he would consider waiving his no-trade for the right opportunity, but there wasn’t massive shock. We’ve come to accept, if not expect, star players, even greatest-ever types, to change laundry at least once in their careers.

Martin Brodeur caused a stir when he told Star-Ledger reporter and THN contributor Rich Chere he would consider waiving his no-trade for the right opportunity.

There was buzz on the Internet and airwaves, but there wasn’t massive shock. We’ve come to accept, if not expect, star players, even greatest-ever types, to change laundry at least once in their careers.

In fact, if Brodeur stays put until the day he retires, he’ll be one of the rarest of exceptions: a Hall of Fame goalie of the modern era who played his entire career with the same franchise.

The only other netminder of that ilk – one who played a chunk of his career post-1967 expansion – is Montreal’s Ken Dryden, who became an honored member more than 30 years ago, in 1983. The other 11 on the list all had multiple fixed NHL/WHA addresses. (To save you looking them up, the roll call includes shoo-in Dominik Hasek plus Ed Belfour, Patrick Roy, Grant Fuhr, Billy Smith, Tony Esposito, Ed Giacomin, Gerry Cheevers, Bernie Parent, Jacques Plante and Gump Worsley).

As for skaters, the phenomenon is similar, though not as stark. Joe Sakic (2012) and Steve Yzerman (2009) are the only ones to accomplish the feat since Mario Lemieux got his plaque in 1997. That’s two of 43 in our sample group from that time span. Nick Lidstrom will join them in 2015, then, well, who knows?

Here, in order of likelihood, are eight candidates to enter the Hall having only belonged to one NHL franchise. To qualify for consideration, players must be at least 30 and be on target to attain low-end Hall of Fame benchmarks. Note, all have no-trade or no-movement clauses except Henrik Zetterberg:

1. Pavel Datsyuk, Detroit, 38 when contract expires.

2. Henrik Sedin, Vancouver, 37 when contract expires.

3. Daniel Sedin, Vancouver, 37 when contract expires.

4. Henrik Zetterberg, Detroit, 40 when contract expires.

5. Duncan Keith, Chicago, 39 when contract expires.

6. Henrik Lundqvist, Rangers, 39 when contract expires.

7. Patrik Elias, New Jersey, 40 when contract expires.

8. Patrick Marleau, San Jose, 37 when contract expires.

So, which of these players is mostly likely to stay? Tell us below and/or vote in our poll.

This column originally appeared in the March 3 edition of The Hockey News magazine. Get in-depth features like this one, and much more, by subscribing now.

Comments
Share X
News

Which NHLer is mostly like to spend his whole career with one team?