• What is your favorite hockey picture of all-time?

    Rory Boylen
    Bobby Orr

    There are so many great photos in NHL history it’s hard to pick just one as your favorite. They come from iconic moments, in random game action, interactions with the crowd and more. Below are some of my favorite hockey photos of all-time with a brief description. Do you share my taste? If not, link to or share some of your favorite photos.

    Bobby Orr

    Heading into the 1969-70 season, Bobby Orr had a Calder and two Norris Trophies already and he’d win the Art Ross, Hart, Norris and Conn Smythe Trophies that season. Whew. His Bruins faced the St. Louis Blues in the Stanley Cup final, a team that reached its third Cup final in a row, but had yet to win a game there (the ’67 expansion teams took a while to become competitive). The Bruins swept the Blues in 1970, but the series was capped off in dramatic fashion. Orr scored 40 seconds into overtime to lead the Bruins to victory after taking a pass from Derek Sanderson in the corner. It was Boston’s first Cup since 1941 and they’d win another two years later.

    In the photo, Orr is flying through the air like Superman after he was lifted off his feet by St. Louis defenseman Noel Picard. Read more

  • The NHL’s 10 worst contracts

    Matt Larkin
    (David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

    It’s not the pre-season, but it’s the pre-pre-season. That means assessing each team’s chances for 2014-15 and beyond, looking their rosters up and down and even checking out their salary cap situation.

    When we peruse the contracts on capgeek.com, our eyes bug out of our head from time to time. “They paid how much for how long for that guy? I forgot about that.” Some deals have cumbersome cap hits, others absurdly long terms for players past their primes, and many have no-trade clauses. The perfect storm of bad contracts contains all three, and some of my picks for the league’s 10 worst deals fit that description.

    We’ll start with No. 10.

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  • Will any GM ever have a summer like Lou Lamoriello did in 1991?

    The cover of the Sept. 20, 1991 edition of The Hockey News questions the landmark ruling that made Scott Stevens a Devil.

    If Scott Gomez and/or Tomas Kaberle make the New Jersey Devils this season and contribute in a meaningful way, GM Lou Lamoriello will be able to claim another feather for a cap that is already bursting with plumage. The veterans are reclamation projects, looking to revive careers that are ever-so-gently flickering.

    Barring the spectacularly unforeseen, however, those potential additions won’t be able to match the magic Lamoriello performed 23 years ago.

    In this edition of Throwback Thursday, we remember the incredible summer of 1991, when the Devils acquired Scott Stevens and Scott Niedermayer via a series of head-scratching events.

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  • In defense of Scott Gomez

    Ryan Kennedy
    Why hate on him when he wants to come home?  (Photo by: Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

    The New Jersey Devils have been a haven for veterans in the past few years and GM Lou Lamoriello has been very good about giving older players one last chance at NHL glory. Petr Sykora landed himself a spot on the 2011-12 squad after a tryout and ended up sixth in team scoring. Martin Havlat was brought in this summer to reboot a career that had stalled in San Jose, while news is trickling out that Tomas Kaberle, who played last season in the Czech Republic with Kladno, has been offered a tryout.

    Oh, and Scott Gomez is getting a tryout too.

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  • Looking at six potential NHL expansion/relocation destinations, from Las Vegas to Hamilton

    Rory Boylen
    The Las Vegas strip. ( (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

    NHL expansion is once again being speculated about after Vancouver Province columnist Tony Gallagher wrote expanding to Las Vegas was a “done deal.” If it’s not speculation about Sin City, it’s about Seattle, or Quebec City or a second team in the Greater Toronto Area. With a 16-14 imbalance between the Eastern and Western conferences, the need for two new teams, or one relocated team is obvious. The sense is that something, in the relatively near future, will change the current alignment.

    While nothing is imminent, where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Where are the potential destinations for NHL expansion or relocation? Let’s have a quick rundown.

    1. Las Vegas
    Aside from the obvious concerns over having a team in a gambling haven, Vegas is an untapped professional sports market. If the NHL does expand there in the next few years, it would be the first into the city. How big of a fan base the team would have and how much long-term interest there would be in a hockey team are legitimate concerns for fans of a league that has cancelled one and a half seasons in the past 10 years to “save” struggling franchises. In Las Vegas, there are plenty of entertainment options that go well beyond the sphere of sport, so how well would a losing team draw fans? Read more

  • NHL expansion is coming, just don’t hold your breath

    GTA Centre Markam

    The NHL has gone a full 14 years without adding a single expansion team, which is the longest period without growth since the league ballooned from six to 12 teams in 1967. The business of hockey is stronger than it has ever been and hockey’s global reach has ensured that the league would be less watered down by adding teams than it has in the past.

    So, yes, the NHL is ripe for expansion. That’s probably why a published report that the NHL is going to add four teams by 2017 was met with such enthusiasm. To follow some accounts, expansion to Las Vegas is a “done deal” despite the fact there is no ownership group in place yet and the league will have new teams in Las Vegas, Quebec City, Toronto and Seattle by the time it blows out the 100 candles on its birthday cake. Read more

  • The All-American Prospects Game will be loaded this year

    Ryan Kennedy
    Zach Werenski is part of an excellent cast headed to Buffalo (Tom Sorensen/USA Hockey)

    The third annual USA Hockey All-American Prospects Game takes place in Buffalo on Sept. 25 and no doubt organizers will tell you it’s looking like the best one yet. People say that about all sorts of events every year, but if everyone shows up, this will be the best yet.

    The game is only as good as the talent available and last year’s installment in Pittsburgh was hampered by the fact the U.S. didn’t produce any top-10 talents for the 2014 class. Sonny Milano, Alex Tuch and Dylan Larkin were the best of the bunch and ended up as mid-round picks. The debut of the game in Buffalo a year prior featured Seth Jones, at the time thought of as the No. 1 overall prospect and ultimately a fourth overall pick who went straight to the NHL. But Adam Erne pulled out and hometown kid Justin Bailey sustained a concussion just before the festivities, meaning a better lineup was possible.

    But this year? Assuming everyone shows up healthy, this is a stacked bill. Here’s a look at some names to keep in mind.

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