• Rumor Roundup: Stars may be aligning for Martin Brodeur

    MartinBrodeur

    It appears the Boston Bruins could look elsewhere for help at right wing. While they reportedly had interest in Buffalo Sabres winger Chris Stewart, Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman claims it doesn’t appear a deal can be made at this time.

    Friedman claims the asking price was either two young players or a young player and a draft pick. CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty commended Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli for walking away, noting Chiarelli is pleased with the improved stability his forward lines have shown in recent games. Read more

  • Brutally blown calls make it clear: it’s time to expand NHL video replay

    Adam Proteau
    NHL referees Mike Leggo and Ian Walsh, and linesman Greg Devorski (Eliot J. Schechter/NHLI via Getty Images)

    The phrase “the straw that broke the camel’s back” is tossed around too often, but when it comes to expanded video review in the NHL, the goalie interference call assessed to Detroit’s Luke Glendening Wednesday night certainly qualifies. Thankfully, the spectacular botch job didn’t decide the game’s outcome, but the fact a call this bad could be agreed on between two referees should be deeply disconcerting to league officials and every team in the league.

    The reality is the game’s speed makes it tougher than ever to assess the action, and when one of the referees goes down to injury as can occur, it makes expanded replay even more vital. And imagine what would happen if a similarly awful penalty/rescinded goal materialized in the final game of the regular season and the result of that game meant the difference between a team making or missing the playoffs. Imagine if a call like that went down during the playoffs – say, in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup final – and there were no option for the officials to skate over to the penalty box area, check a video monitor for a few brief minutes and make sure they got the call right. Fans and media of the team on the wrong end of such a predicament would go apoplectic, and rightfully so; any league unwilling to utilize technology readily available to assure the integrity of its game is a league painfully out of touch with what fans demand in return for their investments of time, money and emotion.

    If it ever got to that point, the NHL would need to hold an IPO to raise its stock to laughing status. Read more

  • Nashville’s Ryan Ellis absolutely trucked old buddy Taylor Hall in Edmonton

    Ryan Kennedy
    Ryan Ellis (Photo by Ronald C. Modra/Sports Imagery/ Getty Images)

    When Edmonton’s Taylor Hall and Nashville’s Ryan Ellis were in junior, they played for some of the most dominant Ontario League teams in recent history, winning back-to-back Memorial Cups with the Windsor Spitfires in 2009 and 2010. And while those squads also featured Adam Henrique, Zack Kassian and Cam Fowler, it was Hall and Ellis that stirred the drink.

    The pair reunited in Edmonton last night and despite giving up three inches and almost 25 pounds to Hall, Ellis destroyed his old buddy with an open-ice hit as the Oilers winger tried to break past him on the rush:

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  • Worst NHL penalty of the season? Oh yeah. Definitely.

    Luke Glendening and Karl Alzner (Getty Images)

    Each NHL season has its share of botched calls from referees. We know going in that, as mere mortals, they’re bound to make errors trying to make sense of a lightning-fast game. However, some blown calls are so egregious, they stand out for years afterward. And one of those calls went down Wednesday night during the game between the Washington Capitals and Detroit Red Wings. As a matter of fact, this might not have been one of the worst penalty calls of the year. It might be the worst in NHL history.

    It was early in the first period in Washington when Capitals goalie Braden Holtby left his crease and went behind the net. As he tried to get back into position, Holtby tripped over his own skates – and the Red Wings pounced immediately, with Drew Miller grabbing the puck and firing it into the Caps’ net.

    However – and inexplicably – the officiating duo of Mike Leggo and Ghislain Hebert decided the goal would not count and that Wings center Luke Glendening deserved a goalie interference penalty. As you can see, he deserved nothing of the sort: Read more

  • NHL suspends Rangers’ John Moore five games for headshot

    Adam Proteau
    Erik Haula and John Moore (Getty Images)

    The NHL’s department of player safety suspended New York Rangers defenseman John Moore five games for his headshot on Minnesota Wild center Erik Haula Monday. Moore will lose $51,859.75 in salary for the hit, which occurred in the second period of Monday’s game. But really, he should be thankful he plays in a league and in a culture that doesn’t take harsher measures to curb concussions.

    When Moore barrelled into Haula, who had just finished shooting the puck, he clearly had no fear of the consequences for what at best can be termed a borderline hit. But imagine if he did. Imagine if he knew that, as the repeat offender that he was, he could be suspended for a minimum of 20 games. Having that knowledge in the back of his head might not have stopped him from making the same split-second decision, but who’s to say it would have no effect? Players (and their families) would be acutely aware of the significant financial penalty they would pay, and there’s every possibility their behavior would be modified and the likelihood of a repeat offense would decrease. Read more

  • Nine games means nothing for New York Rangers rookie Anthony Duclair

    Ryan Kennedy
    Anthony Duclair (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

    When is an 18-year-old not an 18-year-old? When he finds himself analyzed by the NHL’s collective bargaining agreement.

    New York Rangers rookie Anthony Duclair has been a revelation this season, putting in great work at the Traverse City prospects tournament and then parlaying that into a superb showing at training camp. The youngster has his first NHL goal under his belt and now the question is whether the Blueshirts will keep him on Broadway all season long.

    Except the normal nine-game rule doesn’t apply here.

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  • Boston Bruins lose Torey Krug, dig deep into their prospect pool for reinforcements

    Ryan Kennedy
    Torey Krug (Photo by Francois Laplante/Freestyle Photography/Getty Images)

    On the eve of the new season, I was talking to Boston coach Claude Julien about the importance of Zdeno Chara to his younger defensemen. The behemoth captain naturally gave a boost of confidence to his mates when he was out there and one of the beneficiaries was Torey Krug. The young offensive defenseman had a pretty sweet rookie campaign for the Bruins and Julien expected Krug to have a big opportunity to continue that success this season. Then Chara went down with a knee injury.

    Now, Krug has been sidelined with a broken finger that will keep him out of the lineup for two to three weeks. With Kevan Miller also on the shelf and Johnny Boychuk traded to the Islanders, the Bruins defense corps is in dire need of reinforcements. Do they have the right personnel?

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