Rumor Roundup: Jumbo Joe says he won’t go, Ducks searching for backup

San Jose Sharks' Joe Thornton

Former San Jose Sharks captain Joe Thornton has no intention of waiving his no-movement clause anytime soon. Despite an off-season in which Thornton was stripped of the captaincy and mentioned in trade rumors, he told the Toronto Sun’s Mike Zeisberger he considers the Sharks a very good team capable of doing something.

During the summer, there was speculation claiming Sharks management might try to pressure the 35-year-old into accepting a trade. The rumors carried over into this season, as Zeisberger cited a recent report linking Thornton with the Toronto Maple Leafs. Read more

Celebrity overtime: Seven questions with Arrested Development’s Will Arnett

Amber Dowling
Will Arnett (Trae Patton/CBS)

Stars like hockey too, and everyone once in a while they’re more interested in chatting up last night’s game than they are in pontificating about their latest TV or film projects. In our weekly “Celebrity Overtime” feature, we take five minutes with various celebrities to discuss their love of the good old-fashioned game.

Will Arnett is a renowned fan of the game. Since leaving Toronto to star in series like Arrested Development, Up All Night and most recently, CBS sitcom The Millers alongside Beau Bridges and Margo Martindale, he’s carried his Leafs love loud and proud. He even has a friendly behind-the-scenes rivalry with The Millers creator Greg Garcia, a hardcore Caps fan. Read more

Five NHL coaches on the hot seat after one month

Edmonton's upcoming road trip will put Dallas Eakins' job security to the test. (Photo by Jeff Vinnick/NHLI via Getty Images)

What does a slow start mean in the NHL? In some cases, it’s a harbinger of more poor play. Other times, it’s bad puck luck, which is correctable. Regardless of the cause, however, poor starts make heads roll every year. The advanced stats tell us GMs are often too hasty to axe their coaches, but that doesn’t mean it won’t happen. The most common victims are bench bosses who ended the season prior on thin ice. They often get the boot as soon as they give their GMs an excuse to do so.

Here are five coaches who have to think about updating their resumes in the near future.

Read more

Rumor Roundup: Hurricanes GM Francis looking for trade partners

Jordan & Eric Staal (Photo by Jamie Sabau/NHLI via Getty Images)

After going winless in October, the Carolina Hurricanes opened November with their first two victories of the season, downing the hapless Arizona Coyotes and the defending Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings. This recent bout of success, however, won’t stem the growing tide of trade speculation dogging the Hurricanes this season.

ESPN.com’s Pierre LeBrun reports Hurricanes GM Ron Francis is getting phone calls from other clubs interested in making deals with him. Francis claims none of them are willing to make a hockey trade which that makes sense for his club, as they’re attempting to dump bad contracts upon the Hurricanes. Read more

The Hot List: Dylan Strome is burning up the 2015 draft charts

Erie's Dylan Strome (Photo by B Wippert/Getty Images)

Is it too early for world junior speculation? Never! Unfortunately, the speculation comes at the expense of Team USA hopeful Steven Santini. The New Jersey prospect has been sidelined with a wrist injury that will keep him out of the tournament, but there may be a name or two below who can pick up the slack. Check out this week’s round-up of who to know in the world of prospects.

Read more

‘Ulcers’ McCool came from nowhere to win a Stanley Cup, then disappeared

McCool_644x825

By 1944-45, most NHL rosters had been decimated by enlistments in the Second World War. The Maple Leafs were Exhibit A, led by GM Conn Smythe, already a First World War hero, who organized a Toronto Sportsmen’s Battalion of athletes and sports media during the Second World War. The Leafs’ 1942 Cup-winning goalie, Turk Broda, followed Smythe’s patriotic lead in 1943, joining the Canadian armed forces.

That left Toronto’s interim GM, Frank Selke, Sr., in a bit of a jam. He didn’t have a single solid goalie in his lineup – not that Selke didn’t try to find a decent replacement. During 1943-44, Selke filled the Broda gap with an assortment of stopgaps including Benny Grant, Paul Bibeault and Jean Marois. The result was a third-place finish and a speedy first-round exit at the hands of the Habs, who disintegrated Bibeault and his mates in the final game, 11-0, to clinch the round.

The frustrated acting GM was ready to try anything in the autumn of 1944 and ultimately did just that. Against Smythe’s wishes, he hired a skinny netminder afflicted with a bad case of ulcers. What was worse, Frank McCool happened to be a 26-year-old goaltender with no pro experience and no serious action since his university years at Gonzaga five years earlier. But that was better than no goalie at all.

Read more

‘Doogie’ Hamilton ready to fill the enormous void left by Chara injury

Ken Campbell
Dougie Hamilton (Photo by Brian Babineau/NHLI via Getty Images)

Shortly after earning the second assist on the Boston Bruins first goal of the evening Saturday night, Bruins defenseman Dougie Hamilton was referred to as ‘Doogie’ Hamilton by Air Canada Centre public address announcer Andy Frost.

A little bit like Doogie Howser, Doogie Hamilton is something of a child prodigy. All right, that might be a stretch for a 21-year-old kid, but considering he’s already in his third year in the league and due for a big payday next season, we’re prepared to declare him on the fast track. (It also gives us an excuse to run this video.)
Read more

Senators, Maple Leafs, Canadiens hold touching tribute following Ottawa shootings

Josh Elliott
Ottawa shooting tribute

For a nation that identifies itself strongly with hockey, it seemed only fitting that Canadians should gather in their rinks and at their TVs to share a healing moment before puck drop Saturday.

The Ottawa Senators, Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs staged a touching simultaneous tribute Saturday night to two soldiers killed in separate, unprovoked attacks in Canada earlier this week. Ottawa took center stage in the tribute, as Senators players stood shoulder-to-shoulder with the visiting New Jersey Devils for a stirring renditions of the Star Spangled Banner and O Canada from anthem singer Lyndon Slewidge.

Fans in Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto sang the anthem in a simultaneous blend of English and French, while projectors lit up all three rinks with Canadian flags. Read more