Catching up with Crosby: Sid on speed, summer camp and the chance to repeat

Ryan Kennedy
Sidney Crosby with Stanley Cup No. 2  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)

For the second time in his career, Sidney Crosby hoisted the Stanley Cup this year. He also won his first Conn Smythe trophy as playoff MVP with the Penguins. Pretty good, considering his campaign started with an uncharacteristic offensive slump. But once Mike Sullivan replaced Mike Johnston as coach, Sid and the boys went into overdrive and blazed their way to the Cup, shaking off formidable teams along the way.

So how does a champion spend his summer? I caught up with Crosby to find out.

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Are Brad Richards and Vincent Lecavalier Hall of Famers?

Vincent Lecavalier (left), Brad Richards and Martin St-Louis (Photo By Dave Sandford/Getty Images)

From their days together as roommates at boarding school in Saskatchewan to winning a Memorial Cup together in Rimouski to a Stanley Cup in Tampa and signing contracts later in their careers that didn’t quite work out as well as everyone had hoped, Brad Richards and Vincent Lecavalier have had almost parallel tracks when it comes to their hockey careers.

So it is only fitting that they would retire from the NHL in the same year and maybe, just maybe, enter the Hall of Fame together in the fall of 2019. The call on both players will be a vexing decision for the Hall of Fame selection committee. To be sure, there are players who are inferior to both Richards and Lecavalier and accomplished less in the NHL than they did who are in, but induction into the Hall seems to be something of a moving target that is unpredictable.

Richards and Lecavalier had very good NHL careers. But were they truly great, Hall of Fame careers? It’s debatable, which makes things really interesting. Let’s take a look at both players:

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Down Goes Brown: Five times the playoff leading scorer didn’t win the Conn Smythe Trophy

Sean McIndoe
Claude Lemieux with the Conn Smythe Trophy. (Getty Images)

Sidney Crosby captured his first Conn Smythe on Sunday night, earning the nod from media voters in a tough field that hadn’t produced a clear cut favorite. Plenty of fans thought the voters got it right. But others were disappointed, with many of those feeling the honor should have gone to Phil Kessel.

It’s not hard to see why. Kessel is a divisive player (especially among fans of his former teams), but when viewed from a certain angle he makes for a fantastic story. And more importantly, he was the Penguins leading scorer in the playoffs, finishing three points up on Crosby. And that made his Conn Smythe loss to Crosby an unusual one, at least in terms of recent NHL history.

But simply leading a team in scoring is no guarantee of Conn Smythe glory, nor should it be, and the award has a long history of debatable decisions. So today, let’s look back at some of the other cases in NHL history in which a Cup winner’s leading scorer was snubbed by the voters. We’ll ignore the (many) times where a leading scorer was passed over for a defenseman or goaltender, since that tends to be an apples and oranges case. Instead, we’ll focus on cases that fit the Kessel/Crosby pattern, where a team’s leading scorer was passed over for another forward.

As we’ll find out, it turns out that Kessel and Crosby are in good company. Here are five forwards who skated away with the Conn Smythe despite finishing well back of one or more teammates in the scoring race.

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Hockey Night in Canada closes season with incredible playoff montage

Jared Clinton
Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin (via Sportsnet/YouTube)

Be it pre-game, post-game or tributes, Hockey Night in Canada has always produced some of the best montages in sports, and following the conclusion of Game 6’s on-ice celebration by the Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins, Hockey Night delivered once again with a beautiful five-minute look back at the post-season.

The montage splices in mic’d up players, some stirring visuals and brings out the emotion of the post-season, like St. Louis Blues captain David Backes’ tearful recounting of Steve Ott’s dedication to the team and helping to get Backes back in the lineup. There’s also images of tributes to Gordie Howe, audio of local broadcasts during overtime heroics and, of course, two of the post-season’s best goal calls: Read more

Will speed demon Penguins spawn a legion of NHL copycats?

Sidney Crosby (Getty Images)

SAN JOSE – Aside from the players themselves, there are a good number of 18-year-old kids who were thrilled to see the Pittsburgh Penguins win the Stanley Cup this spring.

Unless you follow the prospect world, there’s a good chance you haven’t heard of the likes of Will Bitten, Clayton Keller, Vitali Abramov, Alex DeBrincat and Rasmus Apslund yet. But you will. And depending on how many NHL teams try to copy the blueprint provided by this year’s Stanley Cup-winning Penguins, they might have a better chance to make the NHL than they ever have.

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Watch Kris Letang’s Stanley Cup-clinching goal, Penguins sing ‘We Are The Champions’

Jared Clinton
Kris Letang fires home the Stanley Cup-winning goal (Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

As judged by Conn Smythe Trophy voters, Sidney Crosby was the Pittsburgh Penguins’ best forward — and best player — in the post-season, but it was Kris Letang who was undoubtedly the Penguins’ top blueliner throughout the post-season. It’s fitting then that Pittsburgh clinched the franchise’s fourth Stanley Cup on a goal that saw Crosby and Letang link up.

With the Penguins having their second chance to close out the Sharks and take the Cup, Pittsburgh made sure to keep any glimmer of hope San Jose may have had to a minimum. The Penguins opened the scoring on a power play tally by Brian Dumoulin in the first period, but the SAP Center exploded less than seven minutes into the second frame when Logan Couture tied the game. But in a series where the Sharks trailed for the majority, Game 6 would be much the same.

From the moment the puck was dropped following Couture’s goal, the Penguins took over. Pittsburgh got possession, turned the puck up ice and skated circles around the San Jose zone, putting pucks on net and making Sharks netminder Martin Jones dart back and forth to cover his goal. After nearly 40 seconds of zone time, which included Letang showcasing some fancy footwork along the left wing wall, Crosby dug a puck out of the front of the net, swooped behind the goal and laid a perfect pass out front for Letang to one-time home: Read more