NHL logo rankings No. 3: St. Louis Blues

Rory Boylen
bluesmain

We’re nearing the end of our NHL logo rankings and today we crack the top three with the St. Louis Blues.

The Blue Note has represented St. Louis’ NHL team since its inception in 1967, with some alterations along the way. It’s a symbol that stands not just for the team, but the city and region, which is renowned for its history of jazz and blues music. The color blue is an obvious fit with the name and is accentuated with a yellow that used to take up more space on the logo and jersey.

What we liked about the design were the colors and stylized look that jumps at you. It’s clean, to the point and representative of the city. It’s a slick look that’s easily identifiable. What else can you ask for from a team named the Blues?

If you think you can design something better, now’s your chance. Send your redesigned St. Louis Blues logo to editorial@thehockeynews.com and next week we’ll run all our favorite reader submissions from each NHL team.

HISTORY OF THE BLUES LOGO
In 1967, the St. Louis Blues were one of six expansion franchises that were added on to the NHL’s Original Six. What would the new team be called? For owner Sid Saloman Jr., it was an easy decision. From the St. Louis Blues website:

“The name of the team has to be the Blues,” exclaimed Salomon after being awarded the new franchise. “It’s part of the city where W.C. Handy composed his famed song while thinking of his girl one morning.”

Handy wrote a song called St. Louis Blues, which you can listen to here.

At first, the newly structured NHL was split into Eastern and Western conferences, with the Original Six in the East and the expansion teams in the West. The competition was very lopsided and though the Blues made it to the Stanley Cup final in each of their first three seasons, they were swept every time, twice by the Habs and once by the Bruins.

The original St. Louis Blues logo had the recognizable blue note inside a yellow cycle that said “St. Louis Blues” and “National Hockey League.”

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Getting To Know: Curt Bennett

Curt Bennett (Photo by Steve Babineau/NHLI via Getty Images)

Status: NHL center/winger for St. Louis, Atlanta and the Rangers from 1970 to 1980. Resides in Maui, where he owns Hawaii Waterfalls, which creates rock ponds and waterfalls. He also works in real estate.

Career Accomplishments: Played college hockey at Brown University, where he was NCAA first-team all-American in ’70; selected 16th overall in the ’68 Amateur Draft by St. Louis; played in the NHL All-Star Game in ’75 and ’76; scored 152 goals in 580 NHL games; scored 34 goals for Atlanta in ’75-76; played two years of pro hockey in Japan in the early ’80s.

HT: 6-foot-3 WT: 195 pounds

DOB: March 27, 1948 IN: Regina, Sask.

First Hockey Memory: “When I was a little kid in Rhode Island, my dad was the goaltender for the Providence Reds. I went with him to practice. Back then I couldn’t get my skates tight enough and one of the players on the Reds tied them for me, nice and tight. I was about three.” Read more

Rumor Roundup: Could Marc Staal join his brothers with the Hurricanes?

Marc Staal (Photo by Michael Martin/NHLI via Getty Images)

The New York Post’s Larry Brooks believes the Rangers should get busy re-signing defenseman Marc Staal. The 27-year-old blueliner is eligible for unrestricted free agency next summer. His cap hit for this season is $3.98 million.

Barring another concussion for Staal, Brooks believes the blueliner could command at least a six-year deal worth $5.5 million annually. If the Rangers don’t believe Staal’s worth that much, Brooks recommends investigating his trade value.

The Carolina Hurricanes could be among the clubs willing to pursue Staal via trade this season or free agency next summer. Brothers Eric and Jordan are already on the Hurricanes roster. Perhaps the addition of Marc could provide extra incentive for Eric – whose contract expires in 2016 – to sign an extension next summer. Read more

Which franchise will be the next to win its first-ever Stanley Cup?

Wild-Blues

We recently sorted out our Yearbook predictions for 2014-15, which included projected standings and which team will win the Stanley Cup. Without giving it away, our anticipated winner has been to the promised land before. Which mathematically, should not be surprising. Only 12 of the NHL’s 30 teams have never won the league title and it’s hard to say who will be next. When the Los Angeles Kings won their first Cup in 2012, they broke a streak of futility that had stretched back to 1968 when the team originally entered the league. The following teams would like to join them:

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Jaden Schwartz changes to No. 17 next season in honor of his sister Mandi

Rory Boylen
Jaden Schwartz

In his young NHL career, Jaden Schwartz has found a lot of success wearing No. 9. This past season, he emerged as a big scorer on the contending St. Louis Blues, logging 25 goals and 56 points in 80 games. But he’s changing his number starting in 2014-15 for a very meaningful reason.

Schwartz will wear No. 17 next season in honor of his sister, Mandi, who was diagnosed with myeloid leukemia in 2008 and passed away in 2011 at the age of 23. Mandi wore the No. 17 with the Yale University women’s team.

Jaden announced the number change through Twitter on the weekend. Read more

St. Louis Blues prospects don’t fit the Russian stereotype

Ryan Kennedy
Ivan-Barbashev

When T.J. Oshie ended a classic Olympic showdown by outduelling the Russians in the shootout, he became an instant hero back in the United States. And while most of the host nation was crestfallen by his derring-do, Oshie had at least one Russian on his side: Maxim Letunov thought the American was great.

As luck would have it, Letunov was selected by Oshie’s NHL team, the St. Louis Blues, mere months later at the draft. He went later in the second round after the Blues had taken countryman Ivan Barbashev 33rd overall. Both players may be Russian, but they shatter stereotypes.

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These 23 players can go to arbitration, if they’re not signed to extensions first

reimer

The NHL’s arbitration process is scheduled to begin later this month. Twenty NHL players have filed for arbitration, while three players were taken to arbitration by their teams. Usually, these contracts are settled before the team and player have to face off in front of an arbiter, so expect most, or all, of these to be settled before the process begins.

Arbitration cases will be heard between July 20 and August 5. Here are the eligible players:

Arizona Coyotes
Brandon McMillan - A third round pick by Anaheim in 2008, McMillan played 22 games with the Coyotes in 2013-14, scoring two goals and six points. He also played 46 games with the american League’s Portland Pirates, scoring 11 goals and 26 points. The 5-foot-11 winger was acquired by the Coyotes last year in a trade that sent Matt Lombardi to the Ducks.

Boston Bruins
Matt Bartkowski - A seventh round pick by Florida in 2008, Bartkowski averaged the fourth-most minutes among Bruins defensemen in 2013-14 and scored 18 assists. He was acquired by Boston in what turned out to be an awful trade for Florida, which sent Bartkowski and Dennis Seidenberg to the Bruins for not much at all. Bartkowski has emerged as a physical defensive blueliner who fits in nicely with Boston’s brawny way. Read more

Day 2 draft winners and losers: Calgary stocks up, Toronto sputters

Mason-McDonald

The 2014 draft had little consensus going into Philadelphia and it showed in the results on Day 2 as teams went all over the board with their picks. One thing that became very clear is that teams were valuing upside and potential, swinging for the fences instead of settling for safe selections.

But with the full draft in the books, some teams helped themselves more than others. Here are my winners and losers from Day 2.

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