Watch Justin Abdelkader score controversial, broken-stick OT winner as Red Wings top Blues

Jared Clinton
Justin Abdelkader (Dave Reginek/Getty Images)

The ability for coaches to challenge plays during the game has been talked about for several seasons, but there may be more weight to the argument after Detroit winger Justin Abdelkader and his broken stick helped the Red Wings topple the St. Louis Blues Sunday afternoon.

In overtime, with the Red Wings and Blues tied at one and Detroit on the power play to start the extra frame, the puck got worked around to Marek Zidlicky, who one-timed the puck on goal. Zidlicky’s shot found its way off of Blues goaltender Jake Allen and into the feet of Abdelkader, who was tied up in front of the goal by St. Louis rearguard Alex Pietrangelo.

In Abdelkader’s attempt to swipe the puck into the net, he got his stick caught on Allen’s pads and, as you can see in the video below, his stick actually began to break. Then, with a broken stick, Abdelkader was able to get enough on the puck to knock it home: Read more

Why NHL GMs should welcome expanded video replay – including on goalie interference

Adam Proteau
NHL referee Chris Rooney speaks with off-ice official Augie Conte. (Len Redkoles/NHL via Getty Images)

The NHL’s GMs are enjoying their annual spring meeting in Florida, and one of the questions they’re pondering is the expansion of video replay to include goaltender interference. The GMs have a history of being slow to implement change, and they’re no different on this issue, which they’ve been talking about for years, and the answer has always been the same: they’re comfortable with the inherent subjectivity of the game and are willing to let the on-ice officials make the bulk of the decisions.

And that’s fine. But when the league is dragging its heels in embracing a technology that will benefit its referees in the execution of their jobs, you start to wonder if it really has the best interests of the officials in mind. Read more

NHL makes history with first-ever Russian referee

Evgeny Romasko (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)

It was only fitting that the first Russian to ever referee an NHL game would do it in Detroit, the city that assembled the Russian Five and is home to one of the all-time greatest Russian players in NHL history in Pavel Datsyuk.

Evgeny Romasko made history Monday night by becoming the first-ever Russian-born official to work an NHL game when the Red Wings defeated the Edmonton Oilers 5-2. It took Romasko just four minutes and 52 seconds to call the first penalty of his NHL career, a highsticking minor against Marek Zidlicky of the Red Wings, which impressed his boss, NHL director of officiating Stephen Walkom. Read more

BCHL player receives misconduct for checking ref from behind

Jared Clinton
(via Hockey Webcast/Vine)

Chalk this up as something you don’t see every day – a junior player running into a referee from behind and sending him sprawling into the boards.

Satuday night in the BCHL, in a game between the Chilliwack Chiefs and Surrey Eagles, Eagles defenseman Latrell Charleson was chasing down a loose puck near the end of the game. As the linesman, Troy Paterson, waves off the potential icing, Charleson shoved referee Kirk Wood into the boards from behind. Read more

Montreal Canadiens’ P.K. Subban slapped with fine for diving

Jared Clinton
P.K. Subban (Brian Babineau/NHLI via Getty Images)

The NHL’s war on embellishment continues, and P.K. Subban is the latest victim.

Montreal’s star defenseman was hit with a $2,000 fine for diving on Tuesday following an incident in a Jan. 29 game against the New York Rangers. Subban, like the other players who have been fined, had his wallet dinged because it was his second such infraction.

The play in question occurred when Subban and Rangers winger Chris Kreider came together at center ice after a whistle and, following a shove by Kreider, Subban hit the deck. The 25-year-old blueliner was given a minor penalty for embellishment, while Kreider sat for two minutes for unsportsmanlike conduct. Read more

Good on B.C. amateur league for harsh response to repellent abusive fans

Adam Proteau
(Image via Getty Images)

The Vancouver Island Amateur Hockey Association released Friday an open letter warning members they’re pondering a “spectator-free weekend” of action in response to fans abusing officials and players. And it’s about time other amateur leagues across the continent followed their lead and took similarly harsh measures to address a growing problem.

Minor hockey leagues have realized for years now they have an issue on their hands: the overzealous, expectant hockey parent – the alleged “adult” who thinks it within their right to abuse teenaged referees or players, as if they had some sort of final say on a subjectively-officiated sport. VIAHA president Jim Humphrey made it clear they are ruining the game and the ability of young people to learn and grow in different roles and remain in the system: Read more

Preds coach Peter Laviolette at center of hockey’s first, uh, winking scandal

Adam Proteau
Peter Laviolette (Getty Images)

Many things get said between NHL coaches and on-ice officials during a game. But it’s safe to say the conversation that recently took place between Predators head coach Peter Laviolette and referee Kevin Pollock will not be seen again anytime soon.

During a game between the Blackhawks and Preds at the end of December, Laviolette took umbrage with what he perceived to be Pollock winking at the Blackhawks’ bench. And he did not take it well at all. At. All.
Read more

High school coach charged after allegedly shoving, biting referee

Jared Clinton
Taunton High School Logo

A high school coach in Massachusetts has been charged with assault and battery and disorderly conduct following an incident in which he allegedly chest-bumped, shoved and bit a referee following his team’s 9-1 loss on Wednesday night.

According to a police report, the altercation was fuelled by an icing call that Taunton High School coach, 46-year-old William C. Kenney III, disagreed with. Kenney was released and pleas of not guilty were entered on his behalf, according to a report from The Boston Globe. Read more