NHL logo rankings No. 10: Philadelphia Flyers

Rory Boylen
flyershome

The old adage “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” applies to the black and orange logo used by the Philadelphia Flyers since they joined the NHL in 1967 as part of the first group of expansion teams.

When seven THN staffers gathered to rank the 30 NHL logos, the Flyers were almost universally considered one of the better looks in the league. But it didn’t get enough love to launch it into the top five, so here it will settle at No. 10 in our rankings.

Can you design a better look for the Flyers? Using whichever color scheme you wish (but, really, why use anything other than black and orange?) design a new look for Ed Snider’s Flyers and submit your work to editorial@thehockeynews.com. In two weeks, when our logo rankings finish, we’ll share our favorite reader redesigns. Think you have what it takes?

HISTORY OF THE FLYERS LOGO
The Flyers have been around for 47 years, but there isn’t a history of change behind the logo. When the team was accepted entry into the NHL, ownership opened up a contest to come up with a name for the team. Names related to past Philadelphia teams – Quakers, Ramblers – were popular, but Snider wanted a brand new “big league” identity. The Quakers were attached to the NHL’s record for fewest wins in a season (1930-31) and the Ramblers was the name of a minor league team. Read more

Remembering the season the Capitals begged the NHL for help

Brian Costello
short cover

Machismo and bravado being what they are, there’s no way you’d see this headline in today’s NHL, no matter how poorly the Buffalo Sabres or Edmonton Oilers started a season.

Washington Begs For Player Help

That was the main headline in The Hockey News 40 years ago, early in the 1974-75 season. The expansion Washington Capitals and Kansas City Scouts were both struggling. With just one win in Washington’s first 18 games, Capitals GM Milt Schmidt went to the league and media with hat in hand.

Read more

Signing Michael Del Zotto an indictment of Flyers’ middling defense corps

Michael Del Zotto (Frederick Breedon/Getty Images)

After receiving tough news Tuesday about veteran blueliner Kimmo Timonen, the Philadelphia Flyers moved quickly to replace their most experienced defenseman by signing Michael Del Zotto to a one-year, $1.3-million contract. But the fact GM Ron Hextall turned to a former hot property whose stock has fallen precipitously is an indication Philly’s defense corps could be the area that prevents the Flyers from securing a playoff berth this season.

Since star blueliner Chris Pronger had his career ended in 2011 by post-concussion syndrome, the Flyers have been searching to bolster their blueline. Timonen and Braydon Coburn are the only holdovers from Pronger’s time in Philadelphia, and because the organization hasn’t been able to produce a home-grown d-man of impact, they’ve had to look elsewhere – namely, the New York Islanders, from whom they acquired former Isles blueliners Mark Streit (via free agency) and Andrew MacDonald (via trade). They dealt skilled young winger James van Riemsdyk to Toronto for Luke Schenn. And those moves didn’t produce the desired result; Philly was 17th in Corsi-for last season and were in the lower tier of the NHL in goals-allowed (20th overall at 2.77 goals per game).

Those numbers won’t improve with the arrival of Del Zotto, who at age 24 has arrived at a crossroads in his five-year NHL career and who had to accept a major pay cut (from $2.55 million last season) to continue playing in hockey’s top league. Read more

Flyers defenseman Kimmo Timonen sidelined with blood clots

Ryan Kennedy
Kimmo-Timonen

Veteran Philadelphia Flyers defenseman Kimmo Timonen is being treated for blood clots to his right leg and both lungs back home in Finland, according to the Flyers’ official website.

Timonen, 39, is in the twilight of his NHL career but was still an important part of Philly’s back end last season. His 35 points in 77 games ranked second among Flyers D-men to Mark Streit, while his 20:19 average ice time was part of a pack of four blueliners at the top. Not only that, but Timonen was far and away Philadelphia’s best puck possession player on the back end.

Read more

Test your hockey knowledge. Take the ‘retired or active’ challenge

Jason Kay
image

Brian Boucher’s NHL career was replete with memorable, headline-making moments.

A first round draft pick of the Philadelphia Flyers, Boucher made the NHL’s all-rookie team in 2000, led the league in goals-against average that season, set (and still holds) the league’s modern-day record for consecutive shutouts (five) and played a pivotal role in the Flyers’ march to the Stanley Cup final in 2010.

Yet, when his big league playing days fizzled, there was no major announcement. In fact, we weren’t sure if he was retired or active. After a quick Internet scan, we discovered he played five games last season for Zug in Switzerland and when that didn’t work out, he decided to pack it in.

Read more

Bob Clarke didn’t want Russians in the NHL…and he wasn’t alone

Red Alert

Russians have had a huge impact on the NHL and the way the game is played, but their arrival in North America wasn’t without controversy.

In the August, 1989, edition of The Hockey News, a wave of Soviet stars, riding the crest of glasnost, broke down barriers and signed to play with NHL teams. Slava Fetisov and Sergei Starikov inked in New Jersey. Alexandr (that’s how he spelled it in ’89) Mogilny officially became a Sabre. And Igor Larionov and Vladimir Krutov were brought into the Vancouver Canucks fold.

Some natives, however, remained suspicious and opposed.

Read more

At what point this summer do we change the “U” in UFA to unwanted?

Tampa Bay Lightning v Washington Capitals

For those NHL players who don’t step willingly into retirement, there eventually comes a day when UFA stands for unwanted free agent rather than unrestricted free agent.

As July ends and August begins, we’re now closer to the start of NHL training camps than we are the final game of the Stanley Cup playoffs. For unsigned UFAs, that’s an added layer of anxiety. What if nobody wants me and I’ve played my last NHL game?

Take a browse through capgeek.com and you’ll see half the NHL teams are already at the 23-man NHL roster limit. Another nine teams are at 22 players. And that doesn’t even include the several dozen or so non-roster rookie prospects who will surely make big-league rosters in October.

So not a lot of roster openings remain.

Read more

Flyers, legend Bob “The Hound” Kelly make 104-year-old fan’s dream come true

Adam Proteau
Screen Shot 2014-07-29 at 9.52.43 AM

The power of the Stanley Cup – and even a Stanley Cup championship ring – is such that it can bring to tears people of all ages and from all walks of life. A recent example was seen at a retirement residence in Upper Moreland, Pa., last Wednesday, when a visit from a Philadelphia Flyers legend overwhelmed a hockey fan celebrating her 104th birthday.

The woman who was celebrating, Helen Moser – described by her grandson as a longtime, diehard Flyers fan – was enjoying her birthday festivities at the Wesley Enhanced Living retirement community when Flyers icon Bob “The Hound” Kelly stopped in bearing a cake and a team jersey with her surname and age on the back. The joy on Moser’s face was clear from the moment he walked in, but when Kelly took off his Cup ring and placed it on her finger, she was overcome with emotion. Read more