Legendary coach Al Arbour welcomes fan notes in battle with dementia

Al Arbour

The man who led the New York Islanders to four consecutive Stanley Cups is now looking for a little motivation from his fans.

Hall of Fame coach and player Al Arbour, 82, is reportedly being treated for dementia and Parkinson’s disease at a retirement home in Florida. Toronto journalist Howard Berger tweeted a photo of Arbour in Florida earlier this week (since deleted from Twitter).
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Blackhawks legend Stan Mikita diagnosed with suspected dementia

Jared Clinton
Stan Mikita (Bill Smith/Getty Images)

In a statement released by Stan Mikita’s family, it was announced the Hall of Famer and legendary Chicago Blackhawks center has been diagnosed with what is suspected to be Lewy body dementia.

Mikita, the Blackhawks all-time points leader with 1,467, was an instrumental part of Chicago’s 1961 Stanley Cup championship and is still a fixture with the team, acting as an ambassador and often appearing at team functions. Read more

Even with defensive Devils, Martin Brodeur worthy of spot alongside all-time greats

Ken Campbell
Martin Brodeur Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Martin Brodeur’s 125th and final NHL shutout, with the exception of the fact it was recorded with the St. Louis Blues, was a fairly routine affair. He faced just 16 shots and made a couple of big stops in the first period, but in general terms had a fairly easy night.

Brodeur’s critics will try to diminish his laundry list of accomplishments by saying that Brodeur had far too many nights like that during his career, that he was the beneficiary of playing for teams that played defensive hockey with a religious zeal and didn’t allow chances, either in high number or high quality, that most other goaltenders had to face.

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Marty! Marty! The top 10 moments of Martin Brodeur’s career

Matt Larkin
Martin Brodeur earned himself many curtain calls over his illustrious career.. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

We knew it was coming, and now it’s official: Martin Brodeur does not play hockey in the NHL anymore. The man who rewrote the goaltending record books as a New Jersey Devil will end his brief stint in the St. Louis Blues’ crease and join their front office.

How do we say goodbye to Marty? For starters, let’s fondly reflect on his best career moments. Here are 10 to ponder.

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Watch Dominik Hasek’s banner raising, a fitting tribute to ‘The Dominator’

Jared Clinton
(via NHL.com)

There’s no debating that Dominik Hasek was one of the greatest goaltenders in NHL history, and it’s no question he was the greatest Buffalo Sabres netminder of all time.

With six Vezina Trophoies, two Hart Trophies, and two Lester B. Pearson Awards (now known as the Ted Lindsay Award) to his name during his nine years with the Sabres, there was also no doubt that one day his legendary No. 39 would hang from the rafters of Buffalo’s home arena. On Tuesday, the Sabres did just that, retiring his jersey. You can check out the banner raising below: Read more

The 10 best Hasek saves, on the day the Sabres retire his jersey

Dominik Hasek Buffalo Sabres

Dominik Hasek was an innovator, a hero, and one of the greatest goaltenders in NHL history. Tonight, the Buffalo Sabres will retire his jersey in honor of his incredible career.

With the most unique goaltending style in the history of the game, Hasek dazzled fans well into his 40s. From the snow angel saves to rolling pad-stacking stops that left your jaw on the floor, Hasek could do it all. One of the most exciting players of the past two decades, these are the top 10 stops of Hasek’s career. Read more

Dominik Hasek, Scott Niedermayer headline 2015 IIHF Hall of Fame

Dominik Hasek IIHF HOF featured

Already members of the Hockey Hall of Fame, Scott Niedermayer and Dominik Hasek will enter the IIHF Hall of Fame as part of a seven-member class of 2015.

Other inductees include longtime Czech captain Robert Reichel, Sweden’s Maria Rooth, Fran Rider in the builder category, and Lucio Topatigh, an Italian national rewarded for his play for a non-top hockey nation. Read more

From Beliveau to Balon, Canadiens have a way of treating their former players

Ken Campbell
Beliveau

In their first game back on home ice since the death of Jean Beliveau, the day before what will be an emotional farewell, the Montreal Canadiens listed their official attendance at 21,286, one fewer than a sellout. That was to account for the fact that Seat No. 1 in Row EE, Section 102 was empty.

Some will argue that Jean Beliveau was there all right, but you get the idea. The Canadiens deliberately halted a string of 11 consecutive years of sellouts to honor the memory of one of the greatest players the franchise has ever produced. Read more