Senators trade Jason Spezza to Stars for pennies on the dollar – what does it mean for Bobby Ryan?

Rory Boylen
Jason-Spezza-OTT

When it became known Jason Spezza had requested a move out of Ottawa, the Senators’ asking price was something like a young NHLer, a prospect and a first round pick. Ideally, the trade would have been made at or before the draft so the Sens could recoup the first round pick they gave up to Anaheim in the Bobby Ryan deal. When no deal was struck for Spezza in Philadelphia, we knew for sure the eventual return in this trade was going to come up flat.

And, really, that’s how this was always going to play out. Ryan Kesler was the biggest name and most available center on the market and the Anaheim Ducks didn’t surrender their highest draft pick or any of their blue-chip prospects for him. Meanwhile, the Senators had even less leverage than the Canucks did with Kesler, since Spezza only has one year left on his deal and had already denied a move to Nashville. So it shouldn’t be a huge surprise that Ottawa was only able to get Alex Chiasson, a second-rounder and no-name prospects for Spezza. Read more

Hurricanes’ hiring of Bill Peters as new coach proves Red Wings are a breeding ground for success

Bill Peters (Dave Reginek/NHL via Getty Images)

The question was put to Dallas Stars GM Jim Nill in late 2013: with the GM role having the potential to eat up every waking moment and most of the unawake moments of a man’s life, is delegation of duties a crucial part of his decision-making? His answer was the first thing that came to mind when news broke that the Carolina Hurricanes had hired as their new head coach Detroit Red Wings assistant coach Bill Peters.

“It’s the key to your success,” Nill told The Hockey News. “That’s one thing I learned from (longtime Red Wings executives) Jim Devellano and (current GM) Ken Holland: you have to hire the right people. I talked to my staff about this the other day: the real reward is going to be when my phone starts to ring in a few years and it’s other teams wanting to hire the people we’ve hired.

“I remember (Wings owners) Mr. and Mrs. Ilitch talking about that. That’s what makes them so proud of their organization: they’ve got a coach in San Jose (Todd McLellan), a coach in Ottawa (Paul MacLean), a GM in Tampa Bay (Steve Yzerman), and a GM in Dallas. It shows you’re doing the right things as an organization and that’s what I want to build here. I want good people to do a good job, and I want them to be rewarded not only on the ice, but in the future.” Read more

Hasek, Forsberg, Modano will get Hall of Fame green light

Detroit Red Wings v Colorado Avalanche

Two of them are slam dunks and the other is a very good bet to make the Hall of Fame this year.

When the Hockey Hall of Fame selection committee meets Monday to determine the class of 2014, they won’t have to debate for very long on Dominik Hasek and Peter Forsberg. They’ll be automatics. Mike Modano, on the other hand, might spur debate. He’ll need at least 14 affirmative votes from the 18 selection committee members to make the grade.

Here’s a brief look at the careers of these three first-year eligible candidates The Hockey News is projecting to gain Hall approval for 2014.

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Rumor Roundup: O’Reilly and Avalanche headed towards another contract clash?

o'reilly

For the second time in as many years, the Colorado Avalanche appear headed to another round of contentious contract negotiations with Ryan O’Reilly.

The Avalanche recently elected to take O’Reilly, 23, to salary arbitration rather than pony up $6.5 million to qualify his rights. The Denver Post’s Adrian Dater reports the two sides can continue to negotiate up until July 15, but if still unresolved a date will be set for an arbitration hearing.

Dater claims the Avalanche prefer to use his annual average salary of $5 million as a starting point for negotiations, while O’Reilly’s agent Pat Morris believes it should begin at his actual salary ($6.5 million) for this season. Should this go to arbitration, the new CBA stipulates O’Reilly cannot receive anything less than 85 percent of his actual salary, which would be $5.5 million for 2014-15. He can also chose a one- or two-year contract.

Morris indicated O’Reilly hopes to remain with the Avalanche, but as he’ll be eligible for unrestricted free agent status in two years, this could become a year-to-year situation until his UFA eligibility. This prompted Dater to speculate the Avalanche could shop O’Reilly, noting rival GMs can contact all free agents – restricted and unrestricted – starting June 25, plus there’s a five-day window (July 1 to 5) where O’Reilly can sign an offer sheet. He suggests O’Reilly’s trade value could fetch the stud defenseman the Avs need to become legitimate Stanley Cup contenders. Read more

On the anniversary of Brett Hull’s infamous goal and team’s low point, Sabres’ future is looking blindingly bright

Brett Hull (Joe Traver)

It’s been 15 years to the day that the most infamous game in Buffalo Sabres history began: On June 19, 1999, the franchise squared off in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final – and when it ended in controversy and anguish in the wee hours of the next morning, with Brett Hull’s foot, the rest of him, and his Dallas Stars teammates celebrating their championship on the ice of the then-named Marine Midland Arena (now known as the First Niagara Center), Buffalo fans might have believed they were at their nadir.

Unfortunately for the Sabres, the next decade-and-a-half hasn’t been much better. Sure, they enjoyed a brief resurgence after the 2005 lost lockout season, making two appearances in the Eastern Conference Final. However, in fourteen seasons after playing in the 1999 Cup Final, Buffalo missed the playoffs eight times and made it out of the first round on just three occasions. More often than not, the biggest news coming out of the organization has been about players leaving, ownership changes and management blunders.

That’s the bad news. The good news? Virtually all the circumstances that went on to affect the Sabres in that time have changed. Consequently, the next fifteen years are likely to be much better to Sabres fans. And I mean much better. Read more

See Patrik Nemeth score in OT to win the Calder Cup for Texas Stars

Rory Boylen
texasstars

The American League’s Calder Cup championship was decided in a similar way the Stanley Cup was at the end of last week.

Tuesday night the Texas Stars and St. John’s IceCaps played Game 5 of the Calder Cup final and it went into overtime. With the Stars holding a 3-1 series lead, they had a chance to close out the championship on the road.

And that they did. The Stars took a 2-0 lead in the game before the IceCaps roared back to take a 3-2 advantage. Texas tied it up again with less than 10 minutes to go in the third period. And, in the dying minutes of the first OT period, Texas’ Patrik Nemeth scored the championship goal with this nifty move. Hey, that looks like a Patrick Kane backhander. Read more

Brett Ritchie hoists Calder Cup. Next stop, Dallas and the NHL?

The Hockey News
Brett Ritchie

By Sean Shapiro
It was like being the new kid at school – if you arrived just in time for exams. With the exception of a morning skate, Brett Ritchie didn’t even have a chance to practice with the American League’s Texas Stars before making his 2014 Calder Cup Playoff debut in Game 6 of the second round against the Grand Rapids Griffins May 18.

Nursing an injured ankle back to health, the second-round pick (Dallas, 44th overall in 2011) missed the Stars’ first eight playoff games and hadn’t played since April 13 against the San Antonio Rampage.

Not knowing how the ankle would hold up or how he’d feel jumping into a playoff series against the defending Calder Cup Champions, Ritchie shook off some early jitters and scored in a 7-1 series-clinching victory. “It’s good, it gives you some confidence around the net,” Ritchie said. “I didn’t feel very comfortable around the net at the start of the game, but for that one (goal) to go in, it kind of bounced me back to where I was before I got hurt.”

Ritchie, recapturing his pre-injury form, provided a much-needed boost for Texas as it battled through a seven-game series with the Toronto Marlies to reach the Calder Cup final and a five-game series against the St. John’s IceCaps to win the AHL title. The Orangeville, Ontario native had 11 points in 13 post-season games, two of which came in Tuesday’s 4-3 Game 5 OT win that clinched the Calder Cup for Texas. Read more

Hall Monitor: When will Carbonneau’s defensive greatness be recognized?

Brian Costello
Guy Carbonneau

With the Hockey Hall of Fame’s selection committee scheduled to get together next Monday to determine the 2014 induction class, let’s take a look at one worthy candidate who continues to get overlooked.

Guy Carbonneau never played on the top line, never scored 30 goals or 60 points in a season and was never called the best player in hockey by a Russian coach. Yet his playing attributes and individual awards so closely resemble those of Hall of Famer Bob Gainey, you have to wonder why Carbonneau keeps getting short shrift.

Carbonneau was largely a defensive specialist through most of his 18 seasons in the NHL, even though he had 134 goals and an astounding 323 points during his final two seasons for Chicoutimi in the Quebec League.

He was drafted by the Montreal Canadiens in 1979 at the tail end of their four-Cups-in-four-years dynasty. In order to make the grade, he had to sharpen his defensive play. His first seven seasons with the Canadiens were spent playing with and alongside defensive forward ace Gainey, called the most complete player in the game by Russian coach Anatoli Tarasov in 1979.

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