Here are your winners and losers of the 2015 NHL trade deadline

Antoine Vermette (Norm Hall/Getty Images)

Another NHL trade deadline has come and gone, and whenever it passes, there’s the urge to judge which teams were winners and which ones were at the other end of the competitive spectrum. Of course, any hockey fan paying close attention from year-to-year understands that 99 percent all trades have to be judged over the long-term to be judged fairly. So bear that in mind as we do our best to break down the teams that came away from this season’s deadline – including the days leading up to it, when many of the biggest deals took place – looking great, and which ones came away looking questionable or worse.

Winners:

Arizona Coyotes: There were two types of winners on Deadline Day 2015 – the winners who are loading up for a long playoff run, and the winners who stripped down their roster as part of a long-term rebuild. The Coyotes are clearly part of the latter group, and GM Don Maloney did a ton of work that will quicken the franchise’s turnaround: he shook down Rangers counterpart Glen Sather for (among other things) a top prospect (Anthony Duclair) and first-round draft pick; he also landed Chicago’s first-rounder and a prospect for Antoine Vermette. Read more

Rumor Roundup: Bernier, Stewart among five top remaining trade targets

Jonathan Bernier.  (Photo by John Russell/NHLI via Getty Images)

The NHL trade deadline is only hours away. With Antoine Vermette dealt to Chicago and Curtis Glencross shipped off to Washington, the pool of available trade talent is quickly drying up. Here’s a look at the notable players who could be on the move and the clubs they’re linked to.

Marek Zidlicky, New Jersey Devils. The 38-year-old blueliner has a no-trade clause which will limit where the Devils can ship him. He’s an experienced puck-moving defenseman with a right-handed shot, which could interest the Ducks and Red Wings. CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty suggests the Bruins could also make a pitch. Read more

How the Arizona Coyotes transformed their future in a hurry

Matt Larkin
Anthony Duclair, newest member of the Coyotes organization. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Don’t sleep on them Desert Dogs.

The Buffalo Sabres sure have held our attention this year, plummeting into the standings abyss in an unofficial push to win the Connor McDavid Sweepstakes. The Edmonton Oilers tire fire has populated plenty of headlines in Canada, as has the Toronto Maple Leafs’ shift toward a full rebuild.

But these Arizona Coyotes, I’ll tell ya. They struggle to fill their own building, so it’s no wonder they get lost in the noise. Yet in a span of 24 hours, they’ve set themselves on quite the path toward a bright future.

Read more

Fully engaged Rangers acquire blueliner Keith Yandle from Coyotes in blockbuster, multi-player deal

Adam Proteau
Keith Yandle (Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

You never have to twist the arm of Rangers GM Glen Sather to get him to consider and consummate a high-stakes trade. In fact – and especially at this time of year – he usually walks around with his arm pre-twisted to make a deal more convenient for one of his 29 NHL colleagues. And on Sunday afternoon, he pulled off another major move, acquiring veteran defenseman Keith Yandle, minor-leaguer Chris Summers and a fourth-round pick in 2015 from Arizona in exchange for top prospect Anthony Duclair, defenseman John Moore, a Blueshirts first-round draft pick in 2016 and a second-rounder in 2015.

First, the good news if you’re a Rangers fan: Yandle’s new team is built for the present, and the addition of the 28-year-old, eight-season veteran to a defense corps that includes Ryan McDonagh, Dan Girardi, Marc Staal, Kevin Klein and Dan Boyle makes it one of, if not the best blueline groups in the Eastern Conference. Sather knows Henrik Lundqvist is 32 and Martin St-Louis is 39 and Rick Nash will turn 31 in the summer, and the East is about as wide open as it will get. And this is who Sather is. In his heart, he’s a gambler. Always has been, always will be.

However, here’s the bad (and potentially very bad) news: to land Yandle (who has four goals and 41 points in 63 games this year) Sather had to part ways with a huge trove of treasure: Read more

Rumor Roundup: Blackhawks not done, Zuccarello trade talk heats up

Mason-Zuccarello

The Chicago Blackhawks wasted little time utilizing the nearly $6 million in cap relief from superstar Patrick Kane going on long-term injured reserve. On Friday, they acquired veteran defenseman Kimmo Timonen from the Philadelphia Flyers for a 2015 second-round pick and a conditional 2016 pick. The following day, they shipped minor-league defenseman Klas Dahlbeck and a 2015 first-round pick to Arizona for forward Antoine Vermette.

Blackhawks GM Stan Bowman might not be done dealing. Backup goalie Antti Raanta could be a trade chip. Chicago Sun-Times columnist Mark Lazerus notes Raanta, 25, was recently demoted to the minors while Scott Darling was called up as Corey Crawford’s backup. Lazerus wonders if Raanta still has a future with the Blackhawks. Read more

Chicago acquires Antoine Vermette from Arizona for first-round pick, Klas Dahlbeck

Jared Clinton
Antoine Vermette  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Antoine Vermette didn’t have to wait until Monday to find out where he’s going to finish the 2014-15 season.

Late Saturday, the Chicago Blackhawks and Arizona Coyotes came to terms on a deal involving the veteran center. The trade sees defensive prospect Klas Dahlbeck and a first-round pick in 2015 going to the Coyotes, meeting what Arizona was reportedly demanding for Vermette.

Vermette, 32, was one of the big prizes this deadline, and the acquisition by the Blackhawks appears to be a sign the team intends on spending every last dollar of the cap relief they received when winger Patrick Kane went down with a shoulder injury and was subsequently placed on long-term injured reserve. Read more

Five trade deadline deals that absolutely flopped

David Legwand (Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)

With the trade deadline days away, everyone has taken the time to reflect on the deadline deals that were blockbusters, those that changed a team’s fate or gave them a boost on their road to the Stanley Cup and even looked back at who won long-term.

But what about those deals that looked big at the time but ended up being colossal flops? Not every deal can be a gem and, for one GM in particular, there have been quite a few that looked like they could have made an impact at the time but turned into absolutely nothing.

What constitutes a deadline day flop? The trade has to involve a number of moving parts because, let’s be honest, while a player-for-player deal with two stars is fun, a five- or six-player deal can be much more interesting. In addition, a flop means the trade didn’t work out for either squad, or the team that was supposed to be the buyer, getting the player they believe will put them over the top, has to have the deal backfire badly. Read more