Adam Proteau

Adam Proteau, currently the brand's columnist/writer, has worked for The Hockey News since 2002 and won the Professional Hockey Writers' award for best column in 2006. He also won the Esso Medal of Achievement for most improved player as a 13-year-old at the 'A' level in 1985, but he's less proud of that.

Jarred Tinordi ejected for clean hit – but don’t be mad, Canadiens fans

Adam Proteau
Jarred Tinordi (Jen Fuller/Getty Images)

We’ve known for some time the NHL is at a crossroads when it comes to concussions and protecting the heads of players. In the past – and in putting the sport ahead of those who participate in it – the league has had a default position of giving aggressive players the benefit of the doubt on borderline actions. But maybe things are starting to change for the better. And that’s because we’re starting to see the other side of that spectrum: referees making headshot-related calls that err on the side of caution.

Such was the case Sunday night, when Canadiens defenseman Jarred Tinordi was ejected in the third period of Montreal’s game against Washington after he hit Capitals forward Nate Schmidt at the Habs blueline:

Although some argued Tinordi’s hit was dirty, closer examination – at least, by this viewer – shows Tinordi hit Schmidt cleanly. Read more

So, who wins the Alex Goligoski/James Neal trade now?

Adam Proteau
Alex Goligoski (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

SUNRISE, FLA. – Need another example of how quickly and drastically perceptions of a sports trade can shift over time? Here’s one: for the first few years after it was consummated, the 2011 trade that sent blueliner Alex Goligoski from Pittsburgh to Dallas for winger James Neal and defenseman Matt Niskanen was judged to have been won, and not by a little, by the Penguins. To be fair, the verdict was hard to deny in the first full season after the trade, as Neal put up a 40-goal performance for the Pens in 2011-12 and Goligoski wasn’t improving on the steady numbers he posted before leaving Sidney Crosby & Co.

But nearly four years later, Neal and Niskanen are former Penguins (the former traded to Nashville this summer; and the latter gone to Washington as a well-paid free agent), and Goligoski – who set personal bests in assists (36) and points (42) last season – was Dallas’ third-best point-producer and averaged more minutes (24:18) than any of his teammates. In the final 13 regular season games of 2013-14, his time on ice average jumped to between 27-29 minutes a game; and in Dallas’ first round playoff series against Anaheim, he never played fewer than 26 minutes in any of the seven games and in Game 5 he played 32:48.

Turns out ex-Stars GM Joe Nieuwendyk wasn’t robbed at all on that trade. Turns out Goligoski has turned out just fine and has never been in a better place in his career: as part of a productive No. 1 defensive pairing with Trevor Daley; and on a Dallas team with heightened expectations after veterans Jason Spezza and Alec Hemsky were acquired. Like every player who’s jumped over NHL boards onto the ice, Goligoski has had a showdown with some form of adversity, and he’s overcome it to show why he’s now considered one of the Stars’ key players and leaders. Read more

No more mystery: THN’s guest editor-in-chief is…

Adam Proteau
Roberto Luongo's unofficial Twitter account (courtesy of Luongo)

It’s not every day The Hockey News makes an NHL player our special guest Editor-in-Chief for an issue of the magazine. In fact, in the 67-year-history of our esteemed publication, we’ve never done anything of the sort. And when we initially batted around the idea of asking an NHLer to take on the task this summer, there was really only one man we wanted for the job.

Ladies and gentlemen, THN’s staff presents to you our boss for the next edition (on newsstands and online in mid-October): Roberto Luongo.

That’s right – in addition to training and preparing for the start of his first full season as Panthers goalie since the 2005-06 campaign, Luongo has been hard at work with THN the past couple weeks crafting our next issue. We can’t give you all the details, of course, but the star goalie (a) set the agenda for the issue by choosing stories for our staff to work on; (b) wrote an editor’s notebook (sorry, regular Editor-in-Chief Jason Kay, you’re out of the mix this time) offered greater insight into the end of his time in Vancouver and the trade back to Florida; (c) conducted an excellent interview with another Quebec-born goalie of Italian heritage, Canadiens draft pick Zach Fucale; (d) answered reader questions in a special “Ask Roberto” mailbag; and (e) posed for an out-of-the-ordinary photo for the cover.

To say Luongo was thrilled for the opportunity was an understatement. Sure, he’s been spectacularly successful with his unofficial Twitter account, but this was something different and he embraced it fully. And maybe that’s because the Luongo of September, 2014 is a man at peace with himself after surviving an emotional rollercoaster late in his Canucks career. Read more

Jonathan Huberdeau: the Panther you’d be a fool to forget

Adam Proteau
Jonathan Huberdeau (Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

CORAL SPRINGS, FLA. – Jonathan Huberdeau’s first NHL season ended with him winning the Calder Trophy as the league’s most outstanding rookie. But, like many second-year pros, he discovered consistency over the longer term is more difficult to achieve.

The 21-year-old left winger scored 14 goals and 31 points in the lockout-shortened 48-game NHL campaign of 2012-13, but last year those numbers dwindled to nine goals and 28 points in 69 games. However, the so-called sophomore jinx wasn’t to blame. Instead, the origins of Huberdeau’s struggles can be traced back to the hip surgery he underwent in May of 2013; while the procedure dealt with a nagging ailment, it also set him back in terms of working on all aspects of his game.

“It was hard mentally with the season I had,” Huberdeau said. “It was hard physically, too, but hey, no excuses. I could’ve done better.”

When he finally got his feet under him late in the season (and just before a concussion cost him 11 games toward the end of the campaign), former Panthers interim head coach Peter Horacek inexplicably sheared down Huberdeau’s minutes to what you’d expect to see given to a fourth-liner, not the reigning rookie-of-the-year. Read more

After bumps in the road, Isles’ Kyle Okposo is proving his worth

Adam Proteau
Kyle Okposo (Jim McIsaac/NHLI via Getty Images)

Kyle Okposo’s favorite movie is The Count of Monte Cristo. The protagonist in the famous movie/novel is a teenager who appears destined for success, only to be thrown into turmoil beyond his control. While at his low point, he transforms himself into a learned man and goes about seeking revenge on a world that wronged him.

If you get to know Okposo, you can see why he loves this story. There are some striking similarities between the New York Islanders right winger and The Count. Okposo came into the NHL with much fanfare and a bright future, only to land in deep, sticky mud that caused him to question everything. But from that low point, Okposo has continued to develop and now he’s bent on leaving his mark on a hockey world that has doubted him too many times.

When the St. Paul, Minn., native was drafted seventh overall by the Islanders in 2006, he was coming off a big year at the University of Minnesota. He’d played at the legendary Shattuck-St. Mary’s prep school and used to structure his class schedule so he’d have time to watch schoolmate Sidney Crosby practice. The world was his oyster bar, and he had an all-you-can eat meal plan.

But like all players not named Crosby or Jonathan Toews, Okposo discovered his road to the NHL was not going to be a simple one. After his 18-goal, 39-point rookie NHL season was followed up with a 19-goal, 52-point sophomore effort, he ran into roadblocks. Read more

Wild’s goalie carousel continues with suspension of Josh Harding, signing of Darcy Kuemper

Adam Proteau
Josh Harding (Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photography/Getty Images)

Since the Minnesota Wild first appeared on an NHL ice rink in 2000, they’ve been relatively free of out-of-the-ordinary drama. But their goaltending predicament is shaping up to be one of the league’s most intriguing sagas to monitor this season – and that was before Thursday, when the franchise suspended presumptive No. 1 Josh Harding after he got into an altercation with a teammate, kicked a wall and fractured his foot.

Harding is expected to be sidelined for months by the injury, and left the team with little choice but to come down hard on him. Details of the scuffle he engaged in (including the name of the teammate he clashed with) weren’t made public, but by suspending him, the Wild took his $1.9 million salary cap hit off the books and gave that money to restricted free agent Darcy Kuemper.

But even then, Minnesota’s goaltending saga is far from settled. Read more

Teemu Selanne: “I’d still be playing” if Bruce Boudreau wasn’t Ducks coach

Adam Proteau
Teemu Selanne (Getty Images)

Never ask Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau to play Crazy Eights.

That was the takeaway Thursday after Finnish journalist Juha Hiitelä began Tweeting excerpts from Teemu Selanne’s soon-to-be-released book.

Essentially – and despite calling Boudreau a “nice man” – Selanne threw his former coach in Anaheim under the bus, drove over him with it, backed up, and repeated the process seven or eight times. In the most shocking statement, Selanne said he’d have returned to the NHL for a 22nd season if Boudreau wasn’t still the Ducks’ coach.

But he said much more than that. Here’s the now-retired Selanne describing his experience in the 2014 playoffs, when Boudreau made him a healthy scratch prior to Anaheim’s first round, Game 4 showdown against Dallas: Read more

Human rights verdict great news for transgendered players, hockey

Adam Proteau
Patrick Burke (Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)

Score another one for progress and understanding in the hockey community: as part of a settlement with a Canadian human rights group, Hockey Canada has agreed to allow transgendered minor hockey players in Ontario to choose which dressing room they use before stepping onto the ice.

The settlement ends a human rights complaint filed in August of 2013 by Oshawa, Ont., native Jesse Thompson, a 17-year-old who identifies as a male and who faced numerous obstacles in finding acceptance in the hockey world. Thompson’s mother, Alisa Thompson, told The Canadian Press her son was thrown out of dressing rooms by unenlightened coaches.

“Parents would come in and kick Jesse out of the girls’ change room because it was for girls only,” Alisa Thompson said. Read more