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Fantasy Pool Look: Power shortage?

The Canucks Alex Burrows puts up solid numbers despite not seeing a lot of power play ice time. (Jeff Vinnick/NHLI via Getty Images)

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The Canucks Alex Burrows puts up solid numbers despite not seeing a lot of power play ice time. (Jeff Vinnick/NHLI via Getty Images)

As anyone worth his or her salt in the fantasy hockey world knows, a player’s value leans heavily on his power play ice time and subsequent PP performance. Rarely will you find a high-scoring player who doesn’t see at least second-unit ice time with the man advantage.

There are, however, a handful of players who do see very little PP time, but are consistently average producers when it comes to 5-on-5 play. Here are the top 15 players in even-strength (ES) points, who do not have a single point on the power play (PP):

PLAYER
TEAM
POS
GP
ESG
ESA
ESP
PPG
PPA
PPP
Viktor Stalberg
CHI
L
 43
 14
14
28
Jannik Hansen
VAN 
R
46
12
21 
Jason Chimera
WSH
L
43
13
21 
Lauri Korpikoski
PHX 
L
45
8
11
19 
0
Maxime Talbot
PHI 
C
43
9
18 
0
Radek Dvorak
DAL 
R
43
2
16 
18 
Jiri Tlusty
CAR 
C
47
9
16 
Eric Nystrom
DAL 
L
38
13
16 
Jamie Langenbrunner
STL 
R
42
3
13 
16 
Sean Couturier
PHI 
C
39
8
15 
Erik Condra

OTT 

R
45
6
15 
Vernon Fiddler
DAL 
C
43
6
15 
0
Lars Eller
MTL 
C
42
6
14 
Nick Spaling
NSH 
L
39
7
14 


Looking at this group, you can safely assume some of the older veterans are not going to suddenly find themselves on the top PP unit. For those players, such as Jamie Langenbrunner, Jason Chimera, Max Talbot and Radek Dvorak it will be status quo. No sudden bump because of better PP time. Same goes for the role players, i.e. the ones who are established checkers who bring some nice “pop” to the third line – Lauri Korpikoski, Eric Nystrom and Nick Spaling.

This means that the ones who have not yet carved out a niche as a checker or a scorer are making a great case for themselves. These include youngsters who are destined to be top-sixers, such as Sean Couturier and Lars Eller. This list also includes tweeners,’ players that either have a future on the third line (in which case their production will be status quo) or could be top-sixers (where their production will increase when they start to see PP time). This list includes the likes of Viktor Stalberg, Jannik Hansen, Erik Condra and Jiri Tlusty.

In doing this same analysis, but allowing for as many as four power play points, we get another nice crop of potentials. These are players who are either not seeing much time with the man advantage, or they are just snakebitten when they’re out there. In either case, you could see a boost in the second half if the coach leans on them a little more and/or they shake off the slump:

PLAYER
TEAM
POS
GP
ESG
ESA
ESP
PPG
PPA
PPP
Brad Marchand BOS
L
37
13
15
28
2
1
3
Nick Foligno OTT
L
46
11
16
27
1
0
1
Alexandre Burrows VAN
L
44
14
12
26
3
0
3
Pascal Dupuis PIT
R
44
10
14
24
0
1
1
Bobby Ryan ANA
R
44
16
8
24
0
3
3
Tuomo Ruutu CAR
C
47
13
9
22
2
2
4
Saku Koivu ANA
C
36
9
13
22
0
3
3
Matt Cullen MIN
C
44
9
12
21
2
2
4
Chris Kelly BOS

C

41
10
10
20
1
0
1
Petr Sykora NJD
R
44
9
11
20
1
2
3
Alexander Steen STL
C
36
11
9
20
2
2
4
Artem Anisimov NYR
C
42
4
15
19
2
0
2
Jordin Tootoo NAS
R
42
5
14
19
1
1
2
Zack Smith OTT
C
46
10
8
18
1
0
1
Brandon Dubinsky NYR
C
40
4
14
18
0
1
1
Todd Bertuzzi DET
R
37
8
10
18
0
2
2
Teddy Purcell TBL
R
43
6
13
19
3
2
5
Troy Brouwer WSH
R
43
11
7
18
3
1
4
Tim Connolly TOR
C
32
5
13
18
2
2
4
Sergei Kostitsyn NAS
L
38
9
9
18
1
3
4

Names jump out at you here. Marchand and Burrows, for example, are consistent producers yet rarely see ice time on the power play. That will probably not change. Other players are clearly checkers, but may occasionally see PP ice time if the top units are tired. Dupuis, Foligno, Kelly, Tootoo and Smith jump out.

Still other names, such as Bobby Ryan and Sergei Kostitsyn, are scorers who just haven’t put it together on the power play yet. Their even strength numbers are decent, but the PP numbers are so far off that their entire season is looking weak as a result. Think about it. If Ryan had another 15 points on the power play, would he be considered a fantasy bust? And if Kostitsyn had 10 more PP points, would he?

If you’re looking for more help in your fantasy hockey league, pick up my Mid-season Fantasy Guide – second-half projections, prospects to watch down the stretch and more! To see everything that’s in it, I’ve released last year’s edition for you to check out for free.

Darryl Dobbs’ Fantasy Pool Look is an in-depth presentation of player trends, injuries and much more as it pertains to rotisserie pool leagues. Also, get the top 300 roto-player rankings on the first of every month in THN’s Fantasy section. Do you have a question about fantasy hockey? Send it to the Fantasy Mailbag.

Want more fantasy insider information or to contact The Dobber? Check out
dobberhockey.com or follow him on Twitter at @DobberHockey.

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