• SHARE:
  • email
  • Bookmark and Share

THN.com Blog: Goalie prospect carousel in Future Watch

Jacob Markstrom was taken in the second round (31st overall) by the Panthers in 2008. (Photo by Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images)

Zoom Image

Jacob Markstrom was taken in the second round (31st overall) by the Panthers in 2008. (Photo by Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images)

One neat aspect of putting together our Future Watch issue every season is seeing how scouts analyze the ever-so-difficult vocation of prospect goaltender.

While budding forwards progress at a relatively fast rate and defensemen take a little longer after getting drafted at 18, goaltenders often take five to seven years to progress to the NHL. That's just the nature of the development curve and the relatively few job openings.

Tim Thomas and Miikka Kiprusoff are a couple examples of goalies who didn't hit their prime until their late 20s. There are exceptions, such as Steve Mason, but for the most part all goalies drafted outside the top 10 picks or so are long-range projects.

The top ranked goalie in Future Watch this year is Florida 2008 first-rounder Jacob Markstrom. Back for multiple years are prospects Tuukka Rask, Ondrej Pavelec, Jonathan Bernier, Simeon Varlamov and Cory Schneider.

Of course, there are no guarantees these prospect goalies ranked in the top 50 will ever make it. New Jersey's Ari Ahonen was a top 50 prospect for five years earlier this decade before evaporating into a career in Europe. Rangers first-rounder Al Montoya was supposed to be the next great American-born stopper. He floundered in New York's system before being dealt to Phoenix. Once a top 50 mainstay, he's no longer on the Coyotes top 10 prospect list.

We’re just past the third-year anniversary of Justin Pogge’s ascension from late third round draft pick of the Toronto Maple Leafs to the proclamation of him being Toronto’s goalie of the future.

Related Links

That was in January, 2006 after Pogge had an unbeaten run leading Canada to a gold medal at the World Junior Championship. All of a sudden, it didn’t matter that 40-year-old Ed Belfour was at the end of the line, or that Jean-Sebastien Aubin and Mikael Tellqvist were left tending the home front. Justin Pogge was on the way.

What’s more? Rask, Toronto’s first-rounder in 2005, was fabulous as well at the 2006 WJC and all of a sudden the Leafs were set in goal for the next 20 years.

Three years later, Rask is no longer in Toronto’s system – but is a top prospect in Boston – and the future hasn’t arrived for Pogge.

These are the pitfalls of handing out the “goalie of the future” label. Unlike the undeniable skill of a budding defenseman or forward, prognosticating a goalie’s future is more like gambling.

Future Watch will be available on newsstands in early March.

Brian Costello is The Hockey News’s senior special editions editor and a regular contributor to THN.com. You can find his blog each weekend.

For more great profiles, news and views from the world of hockey, Subscribe to The Hockey News magazine.

More Stories

THN.com Blog: How to determine who is a prospect in Future Watch

One of the many questions we receive in feedback on our annual Future Watch issue, now available...

THN.com Blog: Maple Leafs' Gardiner no longer of first round pedigree

In acquiring Jake Gardiner from Anaheim this week, the Toronto Maple Leafs picked up a...

THN.com Blog: 17 players make our People of Power and Influence list

A neighbour once asked me why on Earth we always put NHL commissioner Gary Bettman No. 1 on our...

THN.com Blog: NHL fans can boo who they want

I must admit I was a little hurt and confused in the aftermath of Toronto Maple Leaf fans booing...
blog comments powered by Disqus

THN on Twitter

If the NHL expanded into one market, where should it go?








Contests

Our Partners