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THN.com Blog: Fans fall short in 'People of Power and Influence'

Fans stand for the national anthem before a game between the San Jose Sharks and Detroit Red Wings. (Photo by Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

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Fans stand for the national anthem before a game between the San Jose Sharks and Detroit Red Wings. (Photo by Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

What about the fans? You forgot the fans!

By far the most frequent question we receive after publishing the annual People of Power and Influence issue is why we don’t recognize the fans on the top 100 list.

Admittedly, the fans are just as important as the players and the owners. It would be impossible to have a multi-billion dollar industry without unconditional representation from all three sectors. The players provide the entertainment, the owners the infrastructure and ways and means, while the fans foot the bill for the entire project.

The popular misconception is it’s the owners who front the bill for everything. While it’s true the owners assume the risk, provide the initial capital and cover any shortcomings, it’s the fans who provide the bulk of the revenue. How important is that?

But importance should not be confused with power and/or influence. While the fans have plenty of the former, they have none of the latter – at least not in a meaningful, unified way.

If the fans had any significant power or influence, there wouldn’t have been a lockout in 2004-05, ticket prices would be affordable in all 30 markets and strong hockey regions such as southern Ontario would have multiple teams because the demand suggests it.

Even though there are millions of hockey fans out there, they have limited influence because of the lack of a unified voice. That’s not a criticism of fans, that’s just the way it is. If fans somehow found a way to not attend games unless tickets were $20 or cheaper, guess what, tickets would immediately become affordable. But seeing that it’s impossible to get all fans to be unified in their behavior, their power and influence remain forever virtual.

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There is an NHL Fans’ Association – its co-founder Jim Boone blogs for THN.com - that has done credible work for more than a decade. But with just 30,000 members, it represents only a fraction of one percent of all hockey fans. Sure, it conducts interesting surveys among its members, but the results surely aren’t enough to sway the opinions and decisions of the NHL’s powerbrokers.

That’s why on our list of the 100 most powerful people in the game, you’re not going to find anyone representing the fan. They’re important, just not influential.

For what it’s worth, ask each of the 100 powerbrokers and they’ll tell you they’re huge fans of the game. In that regard, there are fans on the list.

Brian Costello is The Hockey News’s senior special editions editor and a regular contributor to THN.com. You can find his blog each weekend.

For more great profiles, news and views from the world of hockey, Subscribe to The Hockey News magazine.

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